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Old 06-07-2010, 08:29 AM   #1
wendy.sutherland82
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christian and yoga?

Hi,

My name is Wendy and I was told by a Christian friend of mine that I shouldn't do yoga because of the spiritual attachment to it. I have a blog (see signature) where I love to talk about yoga mats and yoga overall at times. I also share about running and other passionate topics.
A friend of mine has read my blog through my FB link and started attacking me about my articles.

My question is: Is yoga only for non-believers and what sort of spiritual attachments are there to it?

Any advice would do?
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:46 AM   #2
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Hi,

There is an in depth discussion on the same topic here and might give you some insights.

Personally, I don't pay much attention to people like that, the speak from a point of fear and that is not a good point. What does your heart tell you? Follow that and your good sense and healthy mind.
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Old 06-07-2010, 09:27 AM   #3
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I think you should go ahead and continue your studies with yoga!! I'm a Christian and I'm a yogi!! One thing I just learned with my yoga studies...that the ego...I...is attached even to My religion. My religion is the right religion...yours is the wrong. But let's look even at Christianity...My religion..Baptist...is the right one and yours...Catholic...is the wrong one!! Good luck and many blessings to you!!!
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Old 06-07-2010, 03:55 PM   #4
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Hello Wendy,

I'll try to be succinct and not muddy the waters.

There are two points of view from which I can respond to your question. The first is to explain my understanding of yoga as it relates to the topic, based on my ten years of study. The second is to speak experientially about my own path and how the practice has actually affected my living relative to the religion of my birth.

Before going further I think it is important to note Pandara's point. There are many people who wish to argue or judge AND do so from a place of fear. To me, there is no religion on the face of the earth that advocates a living in this way. The forefathers of religion (great masters, all) would likely be appalled at the behavior of some of their "followers" doing such things in "their name". So be forewarned that rational discourse is occasionally impossible with such folk.

Yoga is a tool through we we discover ourselves. It is a tool through we we enhance out connection to Divinity, to our source, our soul, or the light which dwells within. Yoga does not mandate one to adopt a set of beliefs nor does it mandate one to relinquish a set of beliefs. In yoga we learn that there are a myriad of pathways to the Divine, that they are available to everyone, and that they do not exclude your personal beliefs in the teachings of Buddha, G-d, Jesus, Moses, Mohammed, Mother Nature, et al.

Personally I have found yoga to be helpful to deepen my personal connection to my religion, though it is not always in the way(s) others would like. And frankly they are not the one's living my life or steering my ship so how much of an investment can I place in their paradigm of my living.

Yes there are some who claim Yoga is a religion or that it is Hindu and there are others who claim that it welcomes in various elements of darkness. I find both positions to be out of balance and have found nothing but reward - though not always an easy reward - from my practice (which has become far more than postures over the years).
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:43 AM   #5
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I think people have covered everything, but I will put in my 2 cents anyway.

I am a devout Christian with an open mind. I try my best to always live by and for God. I do everything possible to learn about my faith through different means from talking to religious leaders of different faiths to practicing yoga. By practicing yoga, I feel I have deepened my strength in my faith. It has allowed me to learn more about myself, improve myself and take care of His temple (my body). If someone is being so closed minded that they think by practicing a way to better yourself is wrong, then they are the ones mistaken. Also, if this friend continues attacking you, point out to them that they should love you as they God, our Father does which is something he commanded. Also, that in yoga, you practice a form of meditation and that is what many people view as wrong or dangerous and that praying to God is a form of meditation so, if they think that yoga is angerous it would make sense that praying is too. I hope I made sense. *hugs*
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Old 06-08-2010, 01:29 PM   #6
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Dear Wendy,

Since you asked for any advice, I offer this:
Follow your heart of hearts...your Soul.

I am a minister and yoga teacher for many years.
I have had a few similar experiences; these are opportunities for us
to practice love, compassion and tolerance. Yoga is for all...
What a wonderful opportunity for you to articulate how you
feel about your yoga practice, as well as your faith.
I also suggest a lovely and important book by Deepak Chopra,
The Third Jesus, The Christ We Cannot Ignore, 2008.

Best with Blessings,
Rev. Nancy
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Old 06-09-2010, 07:12 AM   #7
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I just came back meeting this Christian priest who teaches Holistic therapies including yoga. He also had gone through oppositions in the beginning.
http://www.clinicalmagnetology.org/photogallery.asp
Yoga is also like Galileo's telescope.Its a tool for searching the truth.
That same old fear is still there within believers. To believe is easy, just stop searching.
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:46 PM   #8
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I completely understand your feelings.

There are many who put on what my meditation teacher refers to as the "white shadow" - a pretense of spirituality for appearance sake.

I believe that part of the work in Yoga is to move toward taking full responsibility for our choices, for our living. And that is a path, not a destination (so I'm not claiming to BE there). But it can provide a quantum leap forward for consciousness to unburden others for that which we have manifested.
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Old 06-15-2010, 06:06 AM   #9
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I completely agree with InnerAthlete’s views.
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Old 06-20-2010, 05:41 AM   #10
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Old 06-25-2010, 04:27 PM   #11
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I love that movie. (the "Buddy Christ" pic above is from "Dogma".) In its lampooning and bungling, it ends with the best answer I've seen humans put in God's mouth to the question, "Why, all of this?" God (played by Alanis Morisette) leans forward and playfully tweaks the person's nose. It was . . . the action of an elder to a beloved youngster. Rather than explaining life, she took the opportunity to share in it.

From my perspective, one thing that popular yoga can do to misalign your spirit is give answers where it's better for you to sit with the mystery.
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Old 06-26-2010, 07:59 PM   #12
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Yeah, Dogma is awesome.

I'm not Christian myself, but I thought that Yoga could help you get closer to whatever God you choose. And if you think about it, perhaps Krishna (or whoever: I'm not an expert in Hindu deities) is simply Jehovah by another name and face. I think God, being loving, comes to us all however we can comprehend it.

Both Yoga and Christianity teach many of the same important principles: compassion, mindfulness, peace, love... Anything other than those elements, such as things like the Trinity, Heaven vs. Hell, baptism, even Christ himself to an extent, is in a way only spiritual decoration. It's the first set that is important. Let God manage the rest.
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Old 06-27-2010, 10:46 AM   #13
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I'm going to play devil's advocate here, by pointing out that yoga is closely associated with Hindu and Buddhist philosophies, beliefs, and practices. Yoga has only been able to gain wide acceptance in the west by distancing itself from the spiritual aspects, placing emphasis on the practice of asanas and pranayama. These certainly can be performed without any reference to religious or spiritual beliefs.

By associating with yoga, you may find that you come into contact with philosophies or beliefs that may conflict with some traditional Christian teachings, and you may find yourself challenging some of your beliefs. This is what frightens many Christians about yoga, but in my opinion, it is a healthy thing to do.
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:08 AM   #14
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Absolutely! And this thread (and all the others like it that spring up from time to time) is a great illustration of that. In the Catholic church (my faith tradition), religion and spirituality are a relationship to the persons of God. The idea that God would masquerade as many persons (Krishna, etc.) and expect us to have a whole-hearted and healthy relationship with him is . . . absurd. Note, I say it is absurd within the context of my tradition, and fully expect that within other contexts it makes a lot of sense. Further, in order to have an I/Thou relationship going with God, there needs to be that 'other' somewhere in the universe, so to me the concept of a universal, unifying Self is very challenging. It causes me to test the aims of my own tradition, which is an excellent practice.
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Old 06-27-2010, 12:58 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asuri View Post
I'm going to play devil's advocate here, by pointing out that yoga is closely associated with Hindu and Buddhist philosophies...
And prayer is closely associated with (insert religion of choice here). But it doesn't belong to (insert religion of choice here) nor does it make prayer "(insert religion of choice here)".
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Old 06-28-2010, 09:03 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wendy.sutherland82 View Post
Hi,

My name is Wendy and I was told by a Christian friend of mine that I shouldn't do yoga because of the spiritual attachment to it. I have a blog (see signature) where I love to talk about yoga mats and yoga overall at times. I also share about running and other passionate topics.
A friend of mine has read my blog through my FB link and started attacking me about my articles.
My question is: Is yoga only for non-believers and what sort of spiritual attachments are there to it?
Any advice would do?
Hey Wendy~

I'm a Christian too and I've heard the same thing. Heck, I've heard that same thing with several things in my life... when I was very young some ill informed but well meaning christians told me to NOT get involved with the martial arts because they're "connected" with "eastern mysticism / religion". I've been in it now for over 31 years and it's never posed one single spiritual problem or diverted me from my own walk with Jesus Christ even one step.

When I was in my early 20's and decided to follow a long line of ancestors into the order of Freemasonry I was told by some ill informed / opinionated, yet well meaning Christians that I was getting involved in the "occult". I'm now a 32nd degree Master Mason and am involved in several different orders as well. I've had nothing that detracted but only ADDED to my spiritual life and involvement with God.

Now, with Yoga. Is there a "Spiritual" side? Yes. I believe there is a great spiritual depth to Yoga available to anyone. Is it a prerequisite? Generally NO. Spirit doesn't necessarily denote something of a "religion" or even having to do with God.....anyone's 'God'. We simply ARE a tripartite being: physical, mental and spiritual. No matter whom/what you believe created us, 'spirit' is simply a part of our experience. I believe that Yoga, like so many other worthwhile endeavors, addresses each of these three aspects of who we are. You can get into Yoga for the physical benefits that are to be had and you'll not go unsatisfied! They're there to be had for sure. You could get into Yoga for the mental challenge that's there and be just as rewarded. Likewise some delve into Yoga for the spiritual 'exercise' that they recieve through it...and they are just as successful. The really great thing, no matter what aspect you enter it FOR...the other two often come along for the ride.

No matter what, whether it's Yoga, Martial arts, esoteric orders...etc., that you're getting into...
if you're a follower of Jesus Christ, if you stay close to him in your heart, your studies and seek Him / serve Him with all of your love, devotion and passion and let nothing get in between you and God.... neither Yoga, nor anything IN it could possibly pose any type of threat.
Remember what Paul wrote in 2nd Timothy 1:12
Quote:
for I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that He is able to keep what I have committed to Him until that Day.
Meaning: you gave your heart and soul to HIM, nothing can undo or interrupt that.

NOTE (caveat) "IN MY OPINION"....there are some Guru that "package" their Yoga instruction / leadership with a strong dose of Hindu-ism or at least Vedic beliefs. This, TO ME, is too much and I feel encroaches on participating in another religion besides the one that has my heart...
Just be mindful of whom you follow and WHAT they're offering or leading you toward. ( Bear in mind any mention of other Deities, that'd be a giveaway )

Your Brother
John

Last edited by Pesilat-Yogi; 06-28-2010 at 09:07 AM. Reason: Bekuz I kant spel so gud
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:43 PM   #17
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And prayer is closely associated with (insert religion of choice here). But it doesn't belong to (insert religion of choice here) nor does it make prayer "(insert religion of choice here)".
It would be nice if it were that simple, but it isn't. Maybe it would help to clarify the connection between Yoga and Buddhism. I use Buddhism because I know a little about it, and I don't know much about Hinduism. You have to think in terms of both philosophy and practice.

Buddhists actually incorporate some yoga practices as part of their religious practice. But yoga was practiced long before Buddha arrived on the scene, was developed independently and to this day is practiced independent of any connection to Buddhism.

In terms of philosophy, Yoga philosophy stands completely on its own, and is not specifically Buddhist or Hindu or anything other than Yoga philosophy. But all Indian philosophies, including Buddhism, were developed during the same time period and contain many similar ideas. That doesn't necessarily mean that these ideas conflict with Christianity. In fact learning about some of these concepts can often deepen one's understanding of his/her own faith. The concepts of karma and reincarnation, which are central to yoga philosophy, come to mind.

Yoga philosophy does contain a concept of a God or Isvara (the Lord), and of devotion to the Lord or religious practice. For adherents to particular religions, the question becomes, does Isvara represent a specific God that is peculiar to Yoga, or is Isvara an archetype that can be applied universally to any religion. The safe solution is to treat Isvara as an archetype, but in my opinion, Isvara does represent a specific God. The Samkhya-Yoga philosophy includes many very specific ideas about the nature of Isvara, some similar to Christianity and some different. Significantly, Isvara is a single God, which is very different from the many gods and goddesses found in Vedic literature. In my opinion, the concept of Isvara is very similar to the Christian concept of the Father. If there is only one God, then they must be the same.

As I said before, yoga can be practiced purely for its health benefits, which does not require one to accept or reject any philosophy or belief. Even at this most basic level, however, one is not likely to succeed in yoga without following basic rules of personal conduct and ethical behavior found in the Yoga Sutras. These are completely in line with Christian beliefs. In yoga philosophy they are considered universal principles, as opposed to the commandments of God. But what is a commandment of God if not a universal principle? Part of this set of principles is devotion to Isvara, but Yoga philosophy doesn't describe any devotional practices other than the repetition of the syllable OM. Most people would probably agree that following one's own religious beliefs and practices satisfies this principle. The Yoga Sutras does include a reference to deity practices, but I don't know anyone who does deity practices outside the context of Vajrayana Buddhism. And I can tell you that in Vajrayana practice, deities are not considered externally existent entities, they are considered to be mental constructs.

In my opinion, other yoga practices, especially meditation practices, are best understood in the context of yoga philosophy and Vedic spiritual practice. For those who have an open mind, these can be rewarding. Yoga is not dogmatic, and personal experience is key. One is encouraged to reject ideas, beliefs, or practices that are found to be false or do not conform with reason or personal experience.
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Old 07-07-2010, 11:01 PM   #18
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a very thoughtful, thought provoking and INTERESTING perspective!!!

Thank you Asuri

namaste
and God Bless
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Old 07-08-2010, 12:18 AM   #19
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here is another perspective. if you go to youtube and type pat roberson yoga you can view a video of him and his views on yoga. He compares it to idoltry and says a christian should not practice yoga but that is his view point.
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Old 07-08-2010, 07:29 AM   #20
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here is another perspective. if you go to youtube and type pat roberson yoga you can view a video of him and his views on yoga. He compares it to idoltry and says a christian should not practice yoga but that is his view point.
I respect Mr. Robertson's efforts to evangelize the faith.....but
many of his "Facts" lack any substance. For instance, I also saw a YouTube of him saying that some martial arts are good but many employ a method of "Breathing in Demons to increase strength and give them powers...."


sheeesh........
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Old 07-08-2010, 08:15 AM   #21
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I think it is pretty clear Yoga is Hinduism. If you are practicing Yoga properly sooner or later you will arrive at exactly the same truths of Hinduism. Hinduism and Yoga cannnot be divorced because Yoga is based purely on Hindu philosophy. It is a technique that was developed out Hindu philosophy. It is rooted in Hindu and Hindu derived philosophies like Buddhism and Jainism.

Is that a bad thing? No, because Hinduism is not a religion. It is a spiritual science with spiritual technologies, that was developed and maintained in India, but could have been developed anywhere else in the universe. It does not matter what beliefs you have, what is your object of worship, what is your language, what is your culture. Hinduism can be studied and practiced without having to change any of these particular things. However, what will change is your general understanding of god, reality, purpose of life. You will become more open to pantheism, reincarnation and attitudes like living in harmony with nature and psychic powers.

The reason this will happen because all of these things are real and natural law. This is why Hinduism is called Santana dharma: eternal natural law. Obviously this is going to clash with Abrahamic religion. A great Sufi yogi once said, "I am the truth" and he was beheaded for it. Jesus Christ, another great yogi, was crucified for saying similar things. Both were born in Abrahamic religion and cultures, but their practice of Yoga was inevitably going to lead them to turning against the orthodoxy.
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Old 07-09-2010, 05:51 AM   #22
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Also google this and read the Article Yoga and Christianity. Are they Compatible? It has an interesting read comparing the two.
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Old 07-09-2010, 07:59 AM   #23
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Wendy (original poster)
....see what I'm saying? Make sure that the underlying philosophy of the teacher / guru / instructor leading your Yoga classes does not directly conflict with your religious beliefs. Some will (as you may have picked up above) and others will not.
Chose wisely and enjoy your journey!!

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John
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Old 07-09-2010, 09:07 AM   #24
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I am Hindu. What's astonishing to me that there are non-Hindus who know more about Hinduism than I do. Shame on me!

Sanatana Dharma, meaning “Eternal or Universal Righteousness” is the original name of what is now popularly called Hinduism.
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Old 07-09-2010, 10:57 PM   #25
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Hinduism and Yoga cannnot be divorced because Yoga is based purely on Hindu philosophy...Is that a bad thing? No, because Hinduism is not a religion.
This is news to me. Looking around the internet, one gets the impression that Hinduism is replete with Gods and temples and priests and people who love to worship. I think that's why most people do consider Hinduism to be a religion. That's exactly why people in the west have divorced yoga from Hinduism, because we are mainly Christian, and cannot accept other gods or forms of worship. In my readings of Indian philosophy, the various philosophical schools are referred to as Indian, not Hindu. I'm beginning to understand that this upsets Hindu people. But one of the charactreristics of the philosophical works is that they don't mention the various gods and goddess and religious rituals. So it seems that even in India, yoga exists outside the Hindu religion. In other words, yoga may be included in Hinduism, but Hinduism isn't included in yoga, in the same way that Buddhism isn't included in yoga. I understand that this is painful for Hindu nationalists to hear, but it is absolutely necessary in order for yoga to be accepted in other cultures. The Indian people should be proud that this part of their culture has gained such wide acceptance around the world.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:28 AM   #26
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There is a superficial understanding of Hinduism as a polytheistic religion that worships a pantheon of gods and goddesses using idols as its primary means. This is the understanding of people who are not very learned in Hinduism.

Then there is a learned and considered understanding of Hinduism, as a henotheistic philosophy that worships a single god using multiple methods, but that is manifest in infinite forms. This is also found in the Rig Veda, "Truth is one, and the wise call it by name names" There are 330 million of these forms recognised by Hindus, and of these 330 million forms the principal forms are Shiva, Vishnu, Duga, which respectively are the deities of the three main traditions of Hinduism: Shivaism, Vaishvaism and Shaktism. All traditions accept several methods of worship: tantra, yantra, yoga, mantra, idol worship and accept several scriptures agamas, shastras, puranas, vedas. It will become clear then Hinduism is not defined by any particular diety, methods or ways, any scripture or founder, or language. Thus Hinduism has no problem embracing the deities, methods or scriptures of any other religion. If a Hindu wanted to accept Jesus as their deity, Hinduism would have no problem with this. In fact Hinduism has the concept of Ishtadevata which means one can choose any object of worship of their choice, even a living person if they wish.

How Hinduism is defined is by its genera philosophy which all Hindu traditions embrace. That is dharma, karma, reincarnation and yoga. Dharma is eternal laws and principles that one should live in harmony with; karma is the law of cause and effect; reincarnation defines ones goal in life as to escape the cycle of birth and rebirth and yoga is any kind of valid technique through which one can attain to the utimate goal of moksha/salvation. These in turn are based on the Upanishadic and Dashana philosophy(aka Vedic or Hindu phiosophy)

It is called Indian philosophy when you are dealing with both Hindu philosophy and Buddhist, Jain and other non-vedic philosophies. But if you are only dealing with the Darshanas, then it is called Hindu or Vedic philosophy. The division between Vedic and non-vedic philosophy is known as astika and nastika(orthodox and non-orthodox) If they are combined together, they are given the secular term, "Indian philosophy"

So it should become clear now Hinduism is its philosophy. More correctly understood, it is a philosophical religion. It is based on generals, not particulars. It does not matter which deity you worship, which scriptures you read, which method you use in Hinduism, this is why there is so much pluralism. What does matter is the core philosophy which is there is a sef, which is infinite and the source of all that is good, and it is our goal in life to realise the sef, and we can use anything that helps us in this journey.

If you believe in reincarnation, eternal laws, cause and effect, chakras, meditation, mantra, yoga, astral planes you are adopting Hindu beliefs. However, they are no more beliefs, than the law of gravity is a belief. These are truths that one will discover in any valid spiritual tradition.

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Old 07-10-2010, 02:09 AM   #27
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Even the word "philosophy" to describe Hinduism is problematic. As philosophy carries the connotations of being simply a system of thought. However, Hinduism does not call itself a system of thought, but an articulation of eternal laws and principles, which are real and therefore it is more accurate to call it science. Indeed, the many words Hinduism uses to describe itself are vidya, jnana, tantra, all carrying systematic scientific connotations.

The science of Hinduism is Samkhya, which is based on a kind of observational physics. Like normal empirical science, through observation of the natural world, it is possible to discover how the world works, such as objects falling according to the law of gravity. However, there is much that is unseen in the world that one cannot know through empirical observation. The ancient Samkhya scientists were aware of this and discovered a method by which the unseen can be known, which what we today call "meditation" They showed that reality consisted of two irreducible substances consciousness and matter, which marked the distinction between knower and known; seer and seen; conscious and unconscious. However, they knew a fundamental error had taken place, because despite the fact that these two substances were ontologically distinct, it appears that consciousness was embodied within matter. They recognised that this embodiment was not a real phenomenon, but was illlusory or unreal(from which the concept of Maya comes from) and this illusion could be undone by becoming aware of oneself as the seer, in other words suspending oneself in a state of awareness(meditation basically) and by doing this one will automatically begin to revert back to the pure state of being and realise the sef.

So how do we suspend ourself in a state of awareness? The Samkhya understood that what prevents awareness from happening was thought activity in the mind. The natural habit of the mind to jump from thought to thought(monkey mind) Therefore in order to remain in awareness the thought activity had to be gradually stopped. Then they realised this coud be done by concentrating on a singe object. It did not matter what the object was, it could have been the word "cat" the aim was to enter into trance and one would then be in suspended awareness. The longer one could maintain that, the closer they came to realising the true state of being.

There are several ways through which this can be accomplished, and in Hinduism they are known as Yogas. Bhakti Yoga is where your object of worship is a chosen deity, and you completely and uttery dedicate yoursef to your deity, eat, drink and breathe your deity. Chant the name of the deity throughut the day. Raja Yoga is meditation. Karma Yoga is where your object is sefless love, where you dedicate yourself to the service of others absolutely(like a saint) Jnana Yoga is where you dedicate yoursef to philosophy and self-analysis, systematically and gradually rooting out all false conceptions of reality and your self(neti neti). Kriya yoga is where you directly work on Kundalini energy through postures, breath work and visualization, in order to awaken it and reach enlightenment. Nada Yoga is where you attain the divine through music, singing, meditating on sound. There are many more Yogas.

If you are doing any of these Yogas already, you are doing Hindu things.

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Old 07-10-2010, 06:18 AM   #28
theicefreezer
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This is what Laruette Willis, the creator of praise moves> very interesting outtake on yoga anbd Christianity. Go to the praise moves website to read more about if you want more. WHy the christian alternative to yoga. Intereting outtake on this.

"From experience I can say that yoga is a dangerous practice for the Christian and leads seekers away from God rather than to Him. You may say, “Well, I’m not doing any of the meditation stuff. I’m just following the exercises.” It is impossible, however, to separate the subtleties of yoga the technique from yoga the religion. I know because I taught and practiced hatha yoga for years. Hatha yoga is the most popular yoga style available on store-bought videos and in most gyms. For an eye-opening account of the background and meaning of “hatha yoga,” please see my notes at the bottom of this page.

Perhaps you have sensed uneasiness while doing yoga (what some call a “check in your spirit”), but you ignored that quiet nudge. I urge you to pay attention to it. Jesus Himself said, “…the sheep follow Him, for they know His voice” (John 10:4).

The yoga mudra (hand gesture or “gateway”) for Namaste (“I bow to the divine in you”), is a Hindu gesture that pre-dates Christianity. The Bible speaks of praying with uplifted hands or “hands spread up toward heaven” (1 Kings 8: 22 and 54; 1 Chronicles 6:13)

“Let my prayer be set before You as incense, The lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice” Psalm 145:1

Your yoga teacher may bow to her class saying, “Namaste” (“I bow to the divine in you.”). Postures have names such as Savasana (the Corpse Pose) and Bhujangasana (the Cobra or Snake Pose). References are made to chakras or “power centers” in the body, such as the “third eye.” The relaxation and visualization session at the end of yoga classes is skillfully designed to “empty the mind” and can open one up to harmful spiritual influences.

Very interesting view even quotes bible verses.


"As Christians, you are instructed to “be transformed by the renewing of your mind” (Romans 12:2), not the emptying of your mind. Many believe that transformation process occurs as we meditate and feed on the Word of God – renewing our minds by filling them with God’s thoughts, not emptying them or filling them with the prideful thoughts of man."

Anyway this a sample of one view point. there are many many more.,
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:45 AM   #29
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सूर्यदेवजी मूर्खो के बीच मौन रहने मे ही भलाई है

where ignorance is bliss tis folly to be wise
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Old 07-10-2010, 11:04 AM   #30
Pesilat-Yogi
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Though extremely interesting, the last many posts are straying a GREAT deal from Wendy's original post.

Might I suggest:
Take the subject of your views of Hindu & Yoga and create it's own thread. That way others interested in Wendy's question can find things relevant to that subject
and
those interested in "Is yoga a strictly Hindu system" can find it and contribute to it??
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